Support for PWS&D’s programs in Ghana help transform the lives of marginalized women and people living with disabilities by advocating for human rights and fostering social acceptance.

In Ghana, women accused of witchcraft and people living with disabilities face many barriers to living healthy, happy and dignified lives. Misunderstood, they are removed from their communities for their differences and have limited access to employment or education. PWS&D is working with the Presbyterian Church of Ghana to overcome these barriers and help vulnerable members of society build brighter futures.

With the help of the Garu Centre, Fati runs a successful business and even has apprentices

With the help of the Garu Centre, Fatima now runs a successful business

At the Garu Community Based Rehabilitation Centre, important life and vocational skills are taught, allowing people with disabilities to discover their abilities. Although Fatima can’t walk, this hasn’t stopped her from achieving a remarkable level of success in her life. At the Garu Centre she learned to sew through a vocational training program. Now she is a sought after seamstress and operates her own thriving business. Renowned for her talents, Fatima mentors apprentices, all of whom are excited everyday to work with and learn from someone so talented.

The Gambaga Outcast Home works to educate and sensitize communities to the fact that when misfortunes occur it is not due to witchcraft. Through the Gambaga Outcast Home’s work, women accused of witchcraft are reintegrated into their communities with the opportunity to improve their livelihoods, free from discrimination. Read about their journey home.

Learn More

PWS&D has information sheets to help you learn more about our programs.

Image of arrow pointing downGhana Information Sheet
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