Eradicating Poverty in Canada: Uprooting Inequity & Cultivating Change

Date: Wednesday, October 5, 2022
Time: 2–3:45 p.m. (Eastern)

Justice Ministries is hosting a webinar on poverty eradication on Wednesday, October 5, 2022, from 2 to 3:45 p.m. (Eastern). Participants will learn about the systemic causes and impacts of poverty in Canada and consider alternatives that uphold the rights and dignity of all people, and the flourishing of creation. Join us to explore how justice requires changes at individual, institutional, community, and systemic levels, and the role churches can play in seeking to eradicate poverty in Canada.

Speaker: Natalie Appleyard
Socio-Economic Policy Analyst, Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ)

Natalie Appleyard

In this webinar, Natalie Appleyard will share research and stories from CPJ’s 2021 Poverty Trends report , exploring the challenges and opportunities of poverty eradication in Canada. Together, we will explore the systemic causes and impacts of poverty in a country as rich as Canada, and consider alternatives that would uphold the rights and dignity of all people, and the flourishing of creation. Participants will be actively engaged in exercises from the Poverty Trends discussion guide , exploring how justice requires changes at individual, institutional, community, and systemic levels.

Natalie is the Socio-Economic Policy Analyst for Citizens for Public Justice (CPJ), an organization “inspired by faith to act for justice.” CPJ seeks to equip and mobilize communities and individuals across the country to advocate for just and sustainable policies in the areas of poverty, refugee rights, and climate justice. Natalie uses her background in education to help convene and share knowledge with a variety of stakeholders. She is a member of the Steering Committees for Campaign 2000 and the Canadian Poverty Institute, and represents CPJ as a co-lead of the Dignity for All campaign. Natalie lives and grew up in unceded and unsurrendered Algonquin Anishinaabeg territory, near the Kichi Sibi river, colonially known as the Ottawa River.